☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆
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Joined 3Y ago
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Cake day: Jan 18, 2020

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I tend to mostly play Roguelikes nowadays. I find they’re great when you only have time to play sporadically. Some of my favorite recent games were:

  • Dead Cells
  • Death’s Door
  • Tunic
  • Stray
  • Children of Morta
  • Neon Abyss





How to say you’ve never seen a map in your entire life without saying you’ve never seen a map in your entire life. 😂



LMFAO look at you a certified expert on where money goes in Russian economy. 😂


Somebody who is capable of basic reasoning would realize that just because something would align with what Russia says doesn’t make it automatically false. Dismissing obvious things by saying it’s a Z route is a logical fallacy, and the fact that you don’t understand that further underscores your lack of intellectual capacity. Congratulations for providing further evidence for that.


Oh look, Jeffery Sachs, who is the Director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University and President of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, going Z route. Get yourself checked for brain worms bud.

https://twitter.com/sahouraxo/status/1576976409485901827


Nobody said Russia doesn’t have problems, what I keep explaining to you is that Russia is much better off relative to Europe. I get that basic facts like food and energy security are really hard for you to wrap your head around.




I imagine he doesn’t want to die in a nuclear holocaust, and he realizes the situation is spiralling out of control.


@pingveno@lemmy.ml, you in particular should listen to what Sachs has to say here. In case you’re not aware, Sachs is Director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University and President of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. He’s not just some crank from the internet.


Oh yeah you’re right, we should definitely look at what the Ukrainian people say instead. Let’s start with what Ukrainian people had to say in the election in 2004:

and then in the 2010 election:

We should also look at what the Ukrainian people have to say regarding which economic bloc they would rather belong to:

source






Which has little to do with your headline “Blinken calls Nord Stream sabotage a tremendous strategic opportunity for years to come.” The association between those two portions of the speech is a complete fabrication.

The association between those two points is pretty direct actually given that he literally lists what these opportunities are.

That paragraph is pretty clear. The Inflation Reduction Act is an investment that will benefit both sides of the Atlantic.

No, it benefits the US because it will be selling gas and products to Europe. It completely fucks Europe because it’s becoming deinudstrialized as a result:



Yeah, that’s sort of the elephant in the room. The west has been printing money like no tomorrow each time there has been a risk of a recession. This goes back at least all the way to the Y2K crisis. They’ve been basically externalizing the problem into the future all this time. Then the pandemic hit and the economic war and all of a sudden printing money doesn’t solve the problem anymore and they don’t know what to do.

Meanwhile, Russia’s been shoring up its economy since 2014 and carefully weaning itself away from the west this whole time so it would be able to survive decoupling. I can guarantee that China’s been doing the same, and these will be the rising economies as western financial system spirals out of control next year.



And so we’ve significantly increased our production as well as making available to Europe liquefied natural gas. And we’re now the leading supplier of LNG to Europe to help compensate for any gas or oil that it’s losing as a result of Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

This is a direct quote stating that US is now the leading supplier of LNG to Europe. Furthermore, it’s not like there isn’t prior context here of US trying to get Europe to switch to using US LNG instead of Russian pipeline gas.

Meanwhile, even the clean energy part of the speech clearly talks about opportunities for US to sell things to Europe:

One way to do that is through the Inflation Reduction Act, which provides more than $368 billion for clean energy technologies like electric vehicles and battery components that are manufactured in North America. It’s the biggest, most ambitious climate investment in the history of our country; it offers a chance for us to deepen our economic integration and expand inclusive economic opportunity for our people.

Stop trying to pretend that tying Europe to American LNG and manufacturing isn’t directly benefiting America at the expense of Europe.


That is not what Blinken said at all. You’re cherry picking pieces of his speech and then putting them together in creative and highly speculative ways.

I gave a literal quote from Blinken where he says that this is a huge opportunity for US based LNG suppliers. Nowhere did he say anything about it being temporary. That’s just you making things up.

You’re literally on here hawking conspiracy theories from a creative interpretation of a speech. Typical conspiracy theorist tactic: find a text and mangle it until it means what you want. So pot meet kettle.

I’m not hawking any conspiracy theories here. I’m simply pointing out that US has a clear motive while nobody else does.

Only a handful of countries have the means to do this, and claiming that it’s more likely that Russia blew up their own pipeline for no reason as opposed to US having done it with a clear reason is precisely the conspiracy theorist tactic one would use. The fact that anybody can even say that with a straight face is absolutely surreal.

US is a terrorist state with a long history of doing precisely these kinds of attacks. You live in a terrorist state buddy. Own it.




I literally said inflation is down to 7.5%:

Inflation in Russia has been falling, and it’s now down to 7.5% already.

I’m sorry I didn’t realize you’re unable to comprehend that inflation being down to 7.5% implies there is change over time in inflation.

And of course, we don’t have to talk about annual rates. We can clearly talk about the change in inflation over past 6 months. Change in Russia has been that inflation is dropping and prices are stable. The change in Europe has been the opposite. These are basic facts of the situation.


Once again, since your reading comprehension is evidently very poor, I’m saying that US is the one country with a clear motive, means, and history of doing such things. You absolutely can debate motives without absolute proof. That’s literally how every criminal investigation starts, by identifying a motive. You’re so bad at this. 😂


Yes, but I’m talking about demand or supply that will met the previous Europe’s exports. The calculations show that those numbers are not met even with the new pipelines, even with more supply and demand. Not sure why this is so hard to understand.

Not sure what part of Russia can build as many pipelines as they need you’re struggling with here. Meanwhile, in the short term Russia is making money hand over fist, so not like they’re hurting in the short term either.

Are you mixing this up to the estimates they have released for 2023?

No, I’m not. I’m talking about month by month inflation. Here’s another breakdown for you https://www.focus-economics.com/countries/russia/news/inflation/inflation-comes-in-at-highest-level-since-february-2016-in-october-0

Consumer prices rose 1.11% in October over the previous month, picking up from the 0.60% increase seen in September. October’s uptick marked the highest reading since March 2015 and was chiefly driven by rising prices for goods and food. Meanwhile, services prices were broadly stable at the outset of Q4.

Inflation increased to 8.1% in October, following September’s 7.4%. October’s reading represented the highest inflation rate since February 2016. Meanwhile, the trend pointed up, with annual average inflation coming in at 6.1% in October (September: 5.7%). Lastly, core inflation rose to 8.0% in October, from September’s 7.6%.

Consumer prices are staying pretty stable. How does that compare with Europe again?