Simply put, proton is great for playing single player games or even ones I don’t mind playing offline like dark souls. However I recently purchased rust and am limited to servers with each disabled. I think a good work around is playing in a vm with my Nvidia GPU run through the onboard GPU. Many of the guides I have tried have yielded no results, idk if I’m doing something wrong. Help would be appreciated, I’m using Ubuntu with a 1080ti and a Ryzen CPU.

Which Ryzen CPU do you have? Most of the existing desktop parts for Ryzen don’t have onboard graphics, which could make things difficult for you.

@yams@lemmy.ml
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I can’t remember exactly but my mother board is a ROG board and in the about of my system it shows I have two cards. I currently have it set to prioritize the Nvidia card for the limited amount of gaming I can do now.

Interesting. It would still probably be helpful if you posted the output of lscpu, which should give some information about what processor you have.

One other thing that could be important, but I’m not sure about, is that I know in the past Nvidia has been restrictive about allowing consumer cards to do what they consider enterprise level things, like GPU passthrough. It has been awhile since I was looking into it closely, though, so things may be different now.

@yams@lemmy.ml
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You were right actually, I then decided to try it on my laptop which has an Intel CPU and when I tried to make Ubuntu use the onboard card it wouldn’t boot. I’m now trying to do it with Manjaro but idk.

krolden
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There’s plenty out there but I found the whole experience to be buggy and annoying on the desktop side so I have been running a GPU in my home server with a GPU passed through to a windows VM which runs steam which I connect to with steam link. There is also geforce now but the comparability isn’t as good last time I checked.

But that’s not what you asked for so check this out

https://gitlab.com/Luxuride/VFIO-Windows-install-walkthrough

@yams@lemmy.ml
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Hmm that isn’t a bad idea though, I recently got a hold of a small server, I don’t have great cooling for it though. How secure would this be to do over a WAN?

krolden
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pretty much as secure as running steam link on any device. it’s basically an optimized remote desktop that runs through steam. I imagine it uses TLS or something for encryption, but it’s not like you’re giving it any access beyond whats on your screen and your keystrokes in game. I have not yet tried it over WAN but I imagine the quality would suffer compared to something local unless you have gigabit or better ISP hookup on both ends.

What are the specs of the server you got? Does it have any pcie expansion? You’ll still want a box that is pretty much the equivalent of your desktop, but tucked away in a rack or well vented closet.

@yams@lemmy.ml
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Yeah it doesn’t even have a GPU built in, that’s fine. Thanks for the recommendation though.

Hatch
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Since you are using a debian forked distro i would follow this guide. Watch it entirely first take notes - then rewatch while following the steps.

https://invidious.snopyta.org/watch?v=BNLnTCqUMyY&t=1243&local=true

@Helix@feddit.de
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https://www.reddit.com/r/VFIO/ – reddit community

https://looking-glass.io/ – software package to do passthrough

Many of the guides I have tried have yielded no results

Please read: How to ask questions about IT problems, especially: What have you tried? by Matt Gemmell

Wait what are you trying to do?

@yams@lemmy.ml
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Play something like rust on windows so I can actually enjoy the experience with a lot of server options.

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